A nasty bug is making its way across the nation and making people feel miserable. Health officials from the CDC report that Minnesota and Wisconsin are experiencing a significant surge in the outbreak.

The onset of sickness is swift. Typically, individuals start experiencing symptoms 12 to 48 hours after exposure, and this virus spreads easily. Check out the symptoms and learn how to safeguard your family below.

Minnesota Now logo
Get our free mobile app

Just like many other illnesses, this virus spreads through contaminated food, surfaces, and being close to infected people. The key to protecting yourself is the usual advice we always hear—make sure to wash your hands regularly and disinfect surfaces.

148231049
David Hernandez
loading...

I know a couple of families going through this at the moment, and in each situation, everyone in the family got sick.

Given how easily this bug spreads, if you're showing symptoms, it's a good idea to stay home as a courtesy to your co-workers.

Highly Contagious Virus Spreading in Minnesota and Wisconsin

The CDC says most "outbreaks in the United States happen from November to April" and there's a significant surge in cases at the moment. Take a look at the symptoms to be aware of and the important thing to do if you become infected below.

Doctor
Getty Images
loading...

Symptoms of Norovirus

The Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota says norovirus "can cause severe vomiting and diarrhea that start suddenly." Those affected may also feel stomach pain or cramps, along with symptoms such as fatigue, fever, and muscle pain.

Dehydration is a significant concern and can worsen the situation. According to experts, if you have norovirus illness, it's crucial to consume ample liquids to replenish the fluids lost due to vomiting and diarrhea.

UPDATE (3/1/24): Norovirus Outbreak Intensifies in Minnesota: Key Signs to Watch For

Highest-paying jobs in Minnesota that don't require a college degree

Stacker ranked the 50 highest-paying jobs in Minnesota that don't require a college degree, using annual compensation data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Gallery Credit: Stacker

More From Minnesota Now