Anglers have been waiting for enough ice to go fishing all winter. The bay in Duluth finally has enough ice for people to walk out on. Last week, reports were that the ice was 4-6" on the bay after the recent cold snap.

While I headed further north this last weekend, I had some friends who went out in search of those walleyes off of Park Point. Shipping season is still happening in Duluth, and it's definitely sketchy when the icebreaker comes by. I've had it happen before, but I never saw a crack like this.

Ken Hayes
Ken Hayes
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My friends David and Kyle parked at the Park Point Boat Launch and dragged their portable out. They fished for a few hours and caught some keeper walleyes. Then the Coast Guard cutter came through and caused a bit of a stir.

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google maps
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I've had it happen before to me, but the ice was usually thicker than this. It's very loud and there's lots of popping and cracking that reverberates across the sheet of ice all the way to the shore. This time, a large crack formed.

David Dennison
David Dennison
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Fortunately, this crack didn't break open completely. They were able to hop over the crack. He said he could see water at the bottom of the crack bubbling up. If the wind had been stronger and blowing from the lake, people could have floated off. It's happened before.

David Dennison
David Dennison
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Warmer temps this week above freezing will continue to make this season's ice fishing a little sketchy at best. Be careful out there! Check ice conditions often and don't go by the calendar this year for how thick the ice should be.

Related: 18 Inches On Plowed Ice Road - 10 Inches Feet Away

LOOK: The most extreme temperatures in the history of every state

Stacker consulted 2021 data from the NOAA's State Climate Extremes Committee (SCEC) to illustrate the hottest and coldest temperatures ever recorded in each state. Each slide also reveals the all-time highest 24-hour precipitation record and all-time highest 24-hour snowfall.

Keep reading to find out individual state records in alphabetical order.

Gallery Credit: Anuradha Varanasi

 

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